Tag: Breakfast

Is Breakfast Overrated?

Aaron E. Carroll, MD has a problem with breakfast. Not the food, but the idea. That is, he doesn’t believe that a designated period each morning should be set aside for eating, especially when he isn’t hungry anyway. Or rather, the science doesn’t back it up.

At first, this seems to fly in the face of modern dietary convention. For years, we’ve been reassured that breakfast keeps us at a healthy weight, alert at school and work, and in overall good shape. But Carroll argues that these studies suffer from confirmation bias— that is, they supported what the researchers want to see proven in their studies. He speaks to two popular studies: one which shows an inverse correlation between skipping breakfast and obesity and another that reveals a link between a lack of breakfast and coronary heart disease. These studies are widely cited, but often times the causation/correlation line is blurred, confusing readers.

Carroll then cites several other studies that contradict common breakfast-time beliefs. One that found getting breakfast eaters to skip breakfast while having breakfast skippers eat it makes no discernible difference in weight loss efforts.

Of great importance is the fact that many studies praising breakfast are funded by manufacturers of breakfast foods. Of course, he says, Quaker oats will fund a study that suggests eating oatmeal will reduce cholesterol and weight… when certain conditions are met.

It’s not that breakfast is bad for you or a waste of time. Instead, Carroll says that we overestimate its importance; for better or for worse, its consumption is not a panacea for the ills that come as a consequence for unhealthy habits. If you’re hungry in the morning, satisfy yourself. But if not, don’t break your back trying to whip something up. The evidence that it will make that much of a difference is scant, at best.

A Breakfast Worth Waking Up For

Dave Pflieger Breakfast

We’ve all heard it: breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It starts you off with high energy, an alert mind, and a general feeling of well-being. Starting your day on the right side of the bed makes adapting to daily demands much easier and you’ll be thankful you have the fuel to power you through a difficult morning.

But what’s the right thing to have for breakfast? How do put together the right meal? Is there something light enough to not bog us down for the hours after, but substantial enough to keep us energized?

Most experts agree that eliminating simple sugars and instead eating foods high in protein and complex carbohydrates is the way to go. This means no partaking in iconic traditions like pancakes and waffles, and you’ll want to skip that side of bacon with the omelette.

One classic combination that has become a recent trend is a bowl of greek yogurt with fruit and granola. Greek yogurt provides a substantial amount of protein while fruit adds a series of vitamins and minerals that are difficult to find elsewhere. They are also low in fat and do not add any extra cholesterol to your diet. (Certain fruit like avocado mimic the nutritional value of nuts—reputably high in protein, fiber, and good fats—and makes it easy to switch out certain fruits and nuts for others.) With the sheer number of granolas and nuts available on the market and the colorful variety of fruits, it’s easy to form a reliable and healthy habit that never becomes monotonous. Switch up your fruits, switch up your nuts. Just make sure to avoid nuts that are cooked in oils or are otherwise flavored as they often carry unwanted extras like sugars and saturated fat.

Another excellent option for protein is the egg. Eggs are a staple breakfast food ranking as one of the most nutritious foods out there. Authority Nutrition says it better than anyone: “A whole egg contains all the nutrients required to turn a single cell into a baby chicken.” Loaded with proteins, fats, and vitamins, the egg is indubitably the most well-rounded single contributor to a healthy breakfast. They also raise good cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease. The versatility and ease in preparing eggs also makes them one of the more fun foods to eat. Omelettes, for example, open up many options as they can be carriers of meats, vegetables, and cheeses, and healthy fats like avocados.

Breakfast starts every day so try and start your day with positivity. Establishing a good routine doesn’t mean leaning on a boring routine. The variety of fruits and nuts and egg preparations gives you endless options for creative cooking. Enjoy!